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Checking Valve Lash on a 2012 Grizzly 700.

Discussion in 'Technical Articles' started by hollap, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. hollap

    hollap Member

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    Sign up at Rock & Ruts forums to view pictures. (5 guests viewing as I type this)

    After spending a couple hours last night researching what the process was to check valve lash on a 700 Grizzly, the only post with pictures I could find on the same engine was that of a Raptor 700r from another forum. So after buying my first set of feeler gauges this morning, I went at it on my Grizz for a couple hours this afternoon taking pictures along the way. I'll explain the whole process for others who are unsure of the details. Seems like the general consensus among dealers is to charge ~$200 for this job. So by the time you make it through all the steps there will be a couple hundred bucks and piece of mind left in your pocket. Lets get to it...

    -Any questions feel free to PM me or post below.

    1. Remove the left floorboard, black rectangular piece that sits over the air-filter and gas lid, left side panel and the piece of black trim from the underside of both front fenders. Straightforward so I forgot to take pictures while doing this :p
    2. Remove the air filter box. There will be 1 rubber strap near the steering stem and 1x4mm allen head bolt hose clamp securing the rubber flange on the injection intake. You'll need a pretty long allen wrench to get at it. A pair of needle nose pliers helped me to turn it here. Next there is 1 hose that's held on by the CVT intake that needs to be popped out and finally one vent hose on the camshaft sprocket lid that needs removal. Last but not least there is also the fuel tank vent hose that need to be disconnected and the o2 sensor plug too (as seen in picture 2). *Removing the air box is really the most difficult part of this project.

    SDC10895.jpg SDC10894.jpg

    3. Next up remove the crankcase cover. When prying it open, it will be a bit stiff as the orange o-ring you see will have a good seal on the engine head. (2x8mm bolts)

    SDC10900.jpg

    4. Next, remove the crankshaft access plug using a big mother of an allen head (see picture). It's possible this plug will have a tight seal because of the o-ring on it as well, was not the case with mine though.
    SDC10896.jpg SDC10897.jpg

    5. Now remove the timing mark plug, up and to the left on the same left engine cover. You can see it in the previous pictures too! Uses another big allen head. Then remove the spark plug too, so you are not fighting compression in the next step.
    SDC10902.jpg

    6. With all three covers off and the internals exposed, we have to set the piston to TDC (top dead center) on the compression stroke. To do so, use a 22mm socket and extension on a ratchet and spin the crankshaft (bottom of the three covers you just exposed) counterclockwise until you line up the "I" engraving on the magneto rotor with the stationary "I" engraving on the magneto cover (small cover). But as you are lining these two marks up, you must also line up the "I" engraving on the camshaft sprocket with the marking on the engine head as seen in picture 2. I circled the marking that you have to align it with as it's tough to see if you don't know what you're looking for. With the two "I" engravings lined up like I have done in the two pictures you have properly set the piston to TDC on the compression stroke. *sidenote: it takes two revolutions of the magneto for 1 revolution of the camshaft sprocket*
    SDC10903.jpg SDC10905.jpg

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    #1
  2. hollap

    hollap Member

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    7. Next move up to the top of the engine head and clean off the valve tappet cover that is directly under the air filter location, and remove the 4x8mm bolts. Be sure to have a grip on the tappet cover as you extract the bolts as it will just slide off at will from the engine oil acting as lube and o-ring pushing up on it. With the cover off feel free to clean it and set it aside for now. You now has access to the two intake valves. Using your feeler gauges, begin measuring the valve lash (gap). Unfortunately I don't have a picture of this step as my hands were full of oil here for the first time. For the 2012 grizzly intake tolerances are 0.09mm to 0.13mm. Mine were at 0.12mm so I left them there. After you are happy with the measurement put a bit of oil on the o-ring on the tappet cover and seal the intake valves back up.
    If you do require a valve lash adjustment, the tools required are a 10mm wrench and a locking pair of needle nose pliers. Yamaha dealers do sell a special tool instead of using the pliers though if you're interested. How can you tell if you have the correct gap for the valves? As you slide in the feeler gauges, there should be just a bit of resistance when you pull them out of the gap. If they slide out without resistance then go up one thickness on the gauge set.
    SDC10906.jpg SDC10907.jpg SDC10910.jpg
    8. Moving over to the exhaust valves, they are located right on top of the exhaust headers behind an identical tappet cover with 4x8mm bolts. Be sure to clean around the tappet cover once again before removal. When I did these valves I lifted the front end of the Grizz so not as much oil leaked out and so I can move the tires to a comfortable position as I was reaching under the fender to measure the valve spacing. I did this part from the right front side of the Grizzly. Check the tolerances the same way you did on the intake valves. Specs on the 2012's are 0.16mm to 0.20mm. Mine were at 0.18mm and 0.19mm, so again I left them well enough alone. Install the tappet cover the same way as the intake one once you're happy with the measurements.
    SDC10892.jpg SDC10911.jpg SDC10916.jpg

    9. Finally back on the left side engine cover, clean the crankshaft and timing rotor covers and reinstall them. Following that remove the orange o-ring from the camshaft cover and give it and the cover a good cleaning if needed and put the o-ring back on dry afterwards. I now cleaned the engine block on the edge of that camshaft opening and proceeded to use engine oil from the dipstick and apply it with my finger to the inside of the edge of the opening where the o-ring will be sitting. This will create a nice seal and make it easy for you to re seat that cover before fastening it down.
    SDC10917.jpg SDC10918.jpg

    Continued...
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  3. hollap

    hollap Member

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    Tool List:
    • - Assorted Screwdrivers, Always handy.
    • - 4mm allen wrench, must be long (for removal of the hose clamp underneath air box)
    • - 8mm socket (Valve Covers)
    • - 22mm socket (to turn crankshaft - counterclockwise folks!)
    • - 14mm? allen wrench - One I used for this was not marked for size (for crankshaft access cover)
    • - Feeler gauges
    • - 10mm socket or open end wrench (In case you actually need to make valve lash adjustments)

    Final Notes:


    • After removing the seat, have a look at the left side plastic. There's a picture there with the required tune up specs, including the valve lash measurements, spark plug gap, recommended fuel among other data.
    SDC10899.jpg SDC10898.jpg
    • Just a left over picture of the intake tappet cover, different angle.
    SDC10890.jpg

    • This may not be the case for everyone but, my valves did not need adjusting this time. The dealer did my first service and I'm not sure if they even checked my valves or not. My Grizzly is at 2075KM and 105hrs.
    • Before I put everything back together, I took advantage the situation to apply dielectric grease to all the electrical connectors I had uncovered under the air box, hood and front end. I was able to spray some grease on the steering stem bearings as well. I only had my grizzly since April 2012 and my coil connections were already oxidized, so I greased those contacts as well and I barely cross deep water!
    • I spent 4.5 hours after it was all said and done today. If I was just doing the valves and not taking pictures and reading someone else's instructions, I would put a time of ~75 minutes start to finish. My engine block is clean so maybe a bit faster :headbang:.
    • Have some beer on standby too.
     
    #3
  4. Hammer

    Hammer Moderator
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    good job and nice write up! thanks for taking the time to do that!
     
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  5. hollap

    hollap Member

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    Thanks! Took me more time to make this post than to do the job :huh: lol.
     
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  6. Hammer

    Hammer Moderator
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    i know all about that!

    i also moved this thread to a more appropriate forum.
     
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  7. Butch450

    Butch450 Administrator
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    Great job. Thanks for the write up.
     
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  8. cubbee

    cubbee Site Supporter

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    Nice write up! I guess I should be checking mine now! lol
     
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  9. mudslinger828

    mudslinger828 Member

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    I need to do this to my grizz. Thanks for the write up!
     
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  10. Chas.

    Chas. New Member

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    Thank You Bump!

    I know this thread's a year old on 9-SEP-13 but I found it profoundly more helpful than any manual or video that I've been able to find. I signed up to the site to convey my thanks to hollap for taking the time in writing this up and taking the photos. The service manual is not this clear. So again hollap, if you're still around these parts, many thanks, kind sir! Very nice, very helpful write-up.

    If I hose it up after reading this I may just have to sell the '12 Grizz hunter and take up knitting... :p
     
    #10
  11. bluesmanjesse

    bluesmanjesse Moderator
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    Lol Chas, good luck with your Grizz. Hollap isn't a frequent poster it seems but he drops in from time to time. He did a nice job on this write up for sure!
     
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  12. hollap

    hollap Member

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    Glad you found it helpful Chas. I'll get around to publishing more articles once I have to tear into my Grizz for bigger maintenance. Haven't had to do anything so far, it's still new.
     
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