Welcome to the Rocks and Ruts Off-Road Powersports Community

Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to sign up today.

Sign Up
  1. Welcome Guest to the Rocks and Ruts Off-Road Powersports Community Forums. Be sure to register. It's quick and 100% free.

How to: Yamaha CVT

Discussion in 'Technical Articles' started by Hammer, Jun 9, 2016.

  1. Hammer

    Hammer Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    2,525
    Likes Received:
    1,478
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania
    After installing larger tires on my Wolverine recently, I started looking into clutching upgrades. I definitely wanted to slug the wet clutch and just couldn’t see getting that far into it without doing at least weights and a secondary spring. I did a little research and decided on a complete clutch kit from Hunterworks. This includes a new, machined primary sheave, 18 gram roller weights, a .5mm shim, new cam plate sliders, a Gold secondary spring, slippery washers for the spring, wet clutch slugs, wet clutch gasket and a new nut for the wet clutch.

    This will be a quick tutorial for anyone wanting to upgrade their clutch, but unsure of how to do it or what is involved. For starters, I highly recommend that you thoroughly wash your machine and have a service manual handy. You are going to have to remove the bed in order to reach the bolts that hold the factory belt snorkels in place. The left side panel and the panel ahead of the left rear wheel will also need to be removed. I took the center console, driver seat and the panel under the driver seat out also. These aren’t necessary to remove, but definitely open things up.
    torn down.jpg

    As you can see, I didn’t get a chance to wash mine beforehand and it just made everything I touched a filthy mess. To get this far you are going to need 10, 12 and 14mm sockets, a flat screwdriver and a Phillips screwdriver. You will also need to drain the engine oil if you are planning to do the wet clutch slugs. If you are only servicing the sheaves you can skip that step. Once you are this far, remove the 10mm bolts holding the clutch cover on and remove the cover.

    clutch cover off.jpg
    Remove the four 10mm bolts holding the bearing support on. The bottom right and top left are longer than the other 2.

    You will need to spread the secondary sheave in order to remove the belt. Hunterworks supplies a bolt for this, but one of the long bolts from the bearing support will also do the job. This picture shows the bolt threaded all the way into the secondary sheave
    secondary bolt.jpg

    Doing this will release the tension from the belt
    belt loose.jpg

    The belt has a directional arrow on it, it should be rotating clockwise. Using a 22mm socket, remove the nuts from the primary and secondary sheaves. You can now remove the belt and both sheaves. Avoid touching the machined surfaces of the sheaves with your greasy paws. Next remove the rear belt cover and then the 8mm bolts holding the wet clutch housing on. Removing this housing was probably the most difficult part. This will take some well-placed blows with a soft faced hammer to get off. The nut holding the wet clutch on is 27mm and is LEFT hand thread.
    wet clutch in engine.jpg
     
    #1
    Courage9027 and ponti1 like this.
  2. Hammer

    Hammer Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    2,525
    Likes Received:
    1,478
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania
    The wet clutch then just slides off of the shaft. Mine was in pretty good shape for having 2k miles on it.

    In his video, Todd suggests using a vise to collapse the Belleville spring in order to remove the E-clips from the wet clutch. I used a pair of Channel Lock pliers.
    wet clutch clips.jpg
    channel locks.jpg



    Remove the top cover, the Belleville spring and the lower cover.
    wet clutch apart.jpg

    The slugs just drop into the holes in the clutch shoes.
    slugs no cover.jpg

    Then reassemble the covers, spring and E-clips


    Clean the gasket surfaces of the engine and the wet clutch cover, being careful to not get any gasket pieces in the engine. Reinstall the wet clutch assembly, and use the replacement nut supplied in the kit. The torque spec is 137 lb/ft but you will need the Yamaha special tool to hold the clutch while torqueing. I used my “pneumatic torque wrench” to tighten the nut since I don’t have the special tool. I then applied some 3M Trim Adhesive to the gasket and reinstalled the aluminum cover. Torque spec for the 8mm head bolts is 86 in/lb. You can now replace the rear half of the plastic clutch cover.
     
    #2
    Courage9027, ponti1 and Butch450 like this.
  3. Hammer

    Hammer Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    2,525
    Likes Received:
    1,478
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania
    Next I started on the Primary sheave. You will need to remove the Philips head screws holding the cover on.
    cover on sheave.jpg

    Then pull the cover off. It will be very tight to remove since there is an O-ring seal under it. Once the cover is off you will find a greasy mess. You need the cam plate from inside the sheave to install in the new sheave.
    cover off sheave.jpg

    Remove the cam plate and you are done with the stock sheave. Clean the camplate thoroughly and remove the old sliders. Replace the sliders with the new ones provided. The sliders are square on one side and triangular on the other, they only fit on the sheave one way, so you can’t screw this up.
    new cam plate sliders.jpg

    You will need to install the new roller weights in the new sheave. You can also see the coating sprayed on the new sheave in this picture.
    rollers.jpg

    Then install the cam plate into the new sheave
    new sheave assembled.jpg

    The area between the seals in the center of the sheave will need a light coat of grease. I noticed that this area had some machining dust in it, so be sure to wipe it clean before greasing in there. You can use white lithium grease or Yamaha’s “Grizzly Grease” for this.

    Next, I changed the spring on the secondary sheave. Hunterworks sells a tool for this, but I have access to automotive transmission tools at work, so I used a foot press to compress my spring. The nut on the secondary sheave is approximately 1 ¾” or 1 13/16”, I don’t remember which. Simply compress the spring enough to remove the nut, remove your compressor and remove the old spring. I didn’t get any pictures of this because I was on company time, LOL. Place BOTH of the “Slippery” washers on the bottom of the spring cup, install the new spring and reverse the process with the spring compressor.
    secondary spring.jpg

    You can install the secondary sheave back on the machine. Make sure to line up the splines and tighten the 22mm nut that holds it on. You will need to thread the bolt back in to spread the sheave in order to install the belt.

    Put the fixed (inner half of the primary) sheave back on, making sure that it is all the way on over the splines
    fixed sheave splines.jpg

    Now slide on the large spacer and the .5mm shim provided with the clutch kit.
    shim 2.jpg

    Install the belt, making sure the arrow is rotating clockwise.

    Next, install the new machined sheave making sure to keep the cam plate pushed in as far as possible. If the cam plate isn’t kept all the way in, the rollers can fall out of place. Install the original washer that fits over the exposed splines and the 22mm nut. Again, I torqued both of the 22mm nuts with my “pneumatic torque wrench”.
    spacer.jpg
    Remove the bolt holding the secondary sheave apart, hold the new primary outward and rotate the secondary sheave until the belt is seated properly
    belt tight 2.jpg

    Reinstall the bearing support. Replace the oil drained earlier, then start it up. You can accelerate the engine and verify that everything is working properly. Replace all of your covers, snorkels and anything else removed to access the clutch.

    Go enjoy your new clutch!
     
    #3
  4. Hammer

    Hammer Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2012
    Messages:
    2,525
    Likes Received:
    1,478
    Location:
    Western Pennsylvania
    This waa done on a '16 Wolverine. Grizzly, Rhino and Viking would be very similar
     
    #4
    liquid1 likes this.
  5. NCMudman

    NCMudman Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,570
    Likes Received:
    1,060
    Location:
    Murphy NC
    Excellent write up! I barely remember all these steps now, it's been around 5 years since I've fooled with all this!
     
    #5
    liquid1 and Hammer like this.
  6. Butch450

    Butch450 Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2012
    Messages:
    4,832
    Likes Received:
    1,505
    Location:
    Rockaway, NJ
    Great write up Jack.
     
    #6
    ponti1, Hammer and liquid1 like this.
  7. bluesmanjesse

    bluesmanjesse Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Messages:
    3,672
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Location:
    Eaton Ohio
    Awesome job Jack, any monkey could do this by following your write up! This kinda stuff is what makes forums so much better than Facebook, and things like this are usually what bring people to the forum in the first place, well done sir, well done!
     
    #7
    Courage9027, ponti1, liquid1 and 2 others like this.
  8. Timmi

    Timmi Site Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Messages:
    2,425
    Likes Received:
    605
    Location:
    Christiansburg, Virginia
    better than facebook?
    heresy!
     
    #8
    bluesmanjesse and Hammer like this.
  9. liquid1

    liquid1 Member

    Joined:
    May 8, 2012
    Messages:
    3,626
    Likes Received:
    713
    Yep better than facebook for knowledge for sure. Drama facebook wins everytime..lol
     
    #9
    ponti1, bluesmanjesse and NCMudman like this.
Loading...

Share This Page